FAQ

    1.  Do I need a permit before burning leaves, brush, and other debris?
    2.  Why does the fire department come when I have called an ambulance?
    3.  Does the fire department rescue cats from trees?
    4.  May I bring my children to the fire department to see the truck?
    5.  Does the fire department teach CPR?
    6.  Are you hiring?
    7.  Does the fire department provide someone to speak to school, church, and civic groups?
    8.  Does the fire department provide home fire inspections?
    9.  Do I need a smoke detector in my home?
    10.  Do I need a carbon monoxide detector in my home?
    11.  Should I call the fire department when my smoke detector beeps?
 
    Q.  Do I need a permit before burning leaves, brush, and other debris?
    A.  Yes. Please call the fire department, 386-9230, and tell them you want a burn permit. A representative from the department will come and check the material and the site safety for burning in your location. Material which may not be burned include, but are not limited to , rubber products, roofing shingles, pressurized containers, flammable liquids containers, and any item which will produce black smoke. Any fire allowed must be extinguished by late afternoon and no fire can be begun after three in the afternoon. If a permit is issued it is for that day only. Even after the issuance of a permit, if we have a citizen complaint or smoke becomes a hazard, the fire will be extinguished.

    Q.  Why does the fire department come when I have called an ambulance?
    A.  1. The fire department is staffed with trained Emergency Medical Technicians and carry on board the trucks the medical equipment to provide immediate medical care, as well as rescue at wrecks and other entrapment type emergencies. 2. The fire department is located at various locations throughout the city and as as result will usually be on the scene providing emergency medical care while the ambulance is responding.

    Q.  Does the fire department rescue cats from trees?
    A.  No. The fire department is an emergency service and equipment cannot be taken out of service for non-emergency use.

    Q.  May I bring my children to the fire department to see the truck?
    A.  Yes. We are glad to see you and appreciate your interest in our work. It would be appreciated if you would call prior to your visit.

    Q.  Does the fire department teach CPR?
    A.  We do not at this time have CPR classes for the public. The American Red Cross and other related organizations do have these classes available.

    Q.  Are you hiring?
    A.  All job opportunities in the City of Muscle Shoals will be posted in the Human Resources section of the Muscle Shoals web sight.

    Q.  Does the fire department provide someone to speak to school, church, and civic groups?
    A.  Yes. For appointments please call the fire department at 386-9230.

    Q.  Does the fire department provide home fire inspections?
    A.  The department inspects businesses, churches, schools, and industry. The department does not inspect homes.

    Q.  Do I need a smoke detector in my home?
    A.  Yes. Smoke detectors allow for early warning and escape. Please check your detectors monthly, have one on each level of your home, and change the batteries twice a year. It is easiest to remember if you change your batteries each time we switch from Daylight Savings to Central Standart Time and vice versa.

    Q.  Do I need a carbon monoxide detector in my home?
    A.  Carbon Monoxide is a colorless, odorless, deadly gas. The most common home sources of CO are unvented gas or oil appliances such as kerosene heaters. A CO detector should be installed on each level of your home, and should be replaced every 2 to 5 years. All CO detectors, as well as smoke detectors, should meet the requirements of Underwriters Laboratories (UL). This certification is on the label.

    Q.  Should I call the fire department when my smoke detector beeps?
    A.  Smoke detectors alert occupants to the presence of products of combustion in a home. They are so sensitive that they often sound the alert even before smoke is observed. The beeping detector may also be the low battery warning. This beep is not the continuous beep as with a smoke alert, but is an occasional beep separated by minutes. A person should exit their home and call the fire department when the smoke detector sounds in the alert mode, which is a loud continual beeping by the detector.